walk in bath with glass door
Nov 14

Walk-In Baths Top Of List For A Safe Bathroom For Seniors


If you were in any doubt about investing in a walk in bath for your home conversion for an elderly family member then magazine for New Zealand’s over-50s GrownUps could convince you.

The news site and community revealed that in New Zealand, one in four over-85s suffer a fall each year and preventing slips, trips and falls in the bathroom where there are potential hazards such as wet floors and loose mats is key.

“A walk in tub is a fantastic option for seniors who prefer taking a bath because they can sit, but don’t have to worry about getting in and out of a slippery bathtub,” the news outlet stated.

As well as walk in baths, GrownUps recommended good non-slip mats for outside the tub or the shower, as well as near the sink where splashes can cause puddles on the floor.

Grab bars are considered an essential for a converted bathroom for an elderly family member, especially in the shower and near the loo, both to assist those who need them to move around independently, as well as to give them a grip should they lose their balance.

Finally, a raised toilet seat is recommended to aid independence and bring comfort to family members who may feel less stable on their feet.

Practical Bathing now offers even more choice of accessible baths with a new product addition to our collection.

The Louisiana 1 shower bath offers a step-through curved glass door with matching shower screen and has been redesigned for 2017 with improved panels.

Oct 16

A simple adaptation providing significant benefits


Another interesting installation. This customer wanted to replace their existing bath with a walk in bath with glass door (the Cirrus Glass), a glass shower screen and a bath shower mixer with hand held shower plus overhead soaker. Minimal disruption was to happen as the parents are both elderly and vulnerable, so work was coordinated to start when they would be away for the day. The job was completed and provides a fresh new bath and shower experience with greatly improved safety.

bath with easy access door
Aug 29

Small Changes For A Safer Bathroom


As well as investing in essentials for a safer bathroom environment for yourself or a loved one such as a practical walk in bath, there are some smaller changes that can make bathing the relaxing experience it is supposed to be for everybody in the family.

Dr Santosh Datar, Medical Director and Consultant Doctor at Ziqitza Healthcare suggested some basic but crucial changes in an article on The Health Site that could bring peace of mind.

Using rubber mats may seem obvious, but a decent non-slip surface is the best way of preventing accidents in the bathroom, as a slip or a fall can lead to unpleasant injuries, especially in an older person.

Dr Datar also suggested installing door furniture that can be unlocked from both sides should the bathroom user require assistance, while allowing everybody privacy at the same time.

The expert also recommended conducting a safety check around the home – and in no room is this more important than the bathroom, especially when it comes to flooring.

Broken vinyl flooring and tiles can be easily forgotten about when you see them every day, but it is little things like a bit of lino buckling by the bath causing a trip hazard, or a fragment of broken ceramic tile that could graze the skin, that are easy fixes.

Dr Datar’s sound advice echoes the recommendations to ensure bathrooms are well illuminated published in the Journal-News, which suggested looking at lighting as an effective way of ensuring the bathroom is a safe room in the house for everybody.

Jul 06

Regular Exercise ‘Could Reduce Risk’ Of Chronic Back Pain


Those of you with mobility issues, pain and sensitive backs may find that doing some regular exercise helps to manage your symptoms, whether it’s something intense like going to the gym or simply increasing the amount you’re walking.

New research from the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health in Helsinki – published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine – has found that regular physical activity could in fact reduce the risk of chronic pain in the lower back by up to 16 per cent, Reuters health reports.

Speaking to the news source, Dr Joel Press – physiatrist in chief at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York – commented on the findings, saying that people are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of activity.

“We were meant to move. We were not meant to be stagnant in any way, so I think this study does confirm that. It’s a big study where they looked at a lot of people,” he explained.

Getting in the swimming pool and engaging in something like water therapy can be especially beneficial for people with conditions like arthritis or anything that hinders movement and makes other forms of exercise difficult and painful.

The force of gravity is less when you’re in the water which means that a lot less pressure is put on your spine and joints, so you can exercise and increase your body movements without putting any excess strain on places that might be sensitive or painful. It’s also easier to move about in water, so this kind of therapy can help you build up your muscle strength as well.

Need new small walk in baths? Take a look at what we’ve got in stock.

Mar 09

Obesity Linked To Arthritis


A new study conducted in Canada has found that obesity could be linked to a higher rate of arthritis, which could also explain why a higher number of younger people are suffering from the painful condition.

The Express reported on the research, which was conducted by scientists at the University of Toronto, who examined data from over 8,000 participants in the Canadian longitudinal national population health survey.

By splitting them into four birth groups, ranging from those born during World War 2 to so-called Generation X (those born in the late 1960s and early 70s), they have been able to look at generational differences as well as lifestyle issues.

The researchers found that those in younger generations were at a higher risk of developing arthritis, as well as noting that those who were obese were more likely to develop the condition.

Lead author Dr Elizabeth Badly commented: “The odds of reporting arthritis increased with increasing levels of BMI.”

She added that those who were classed as severely obese were 2.5 times more likely to suffer from arthritis than those of a normal weight. Smoking was another risk factor that was found to increase the likelihood of people developing arthritis.

Last month, Arthritis Research UK highlighted a study which found that men with rheumatoid arthritis also have mental struggles with the condition that women don’t share.

The research by the University of the West of England revealed that men often find the condition challenges their perception of their own masculinity, and can leave them feeling powerless.

If you suffer from arthritis, you should make everyday tasks in your home as easy as possible. This could include fitting a walk in bath to make it easier and less painful for you to bathe.

Jan 12

More Elderly Brits Opting For Live-In Carers


With more and more people in the UK living longer, a growing number of families are having to face the difficult decision of whether to move their relatives into care homes.

However, the Telegraph reveals that there is growing interest in live-in carers, where a carer moves into an elderly person’s home to help them with day-to-day tasks and to provide companionship.

The newspaper revealed that the cost of having a live-in carer is comparable to the expense of moving into a care home, but that there could be other advantages for those who are able to stay in their own homes.

The publication cited research which showed older people who stayed in their own homes with live-in care and where the appropriate adaptations have been made, such as installing railings, walk-in baths and easy access toilets, are less likely to suffer falls and need treatment for hip fractures.

In fact, those who stay at home suffer one third fewer falls than their counterparts who are in care homes.

And there are a number of steps people can take to make their homes safer as they get older, including fitting handrails on both sides of staircases, making sure there is non-slip flooring in rooms that are likely to get wet, such as bathrooms or kitchens, and fitting seats in showers to make washing easier.

Elderly people themselves should also consider what shoes they wear in the house and ensure these are comfy, have good grip and are sensible, as well as making sure that their home is kept tidy and unnecessary obstructions aren’t left lying around.

However, the issue currently being faced by the care sector is finding enough live-in carers to meet the growing demand.

Dec 30

Start 2017 With A New Bathroom


The start of a new year is a great opportunity to make changes to your life, including alternations in your home. And if you are struggling to use the facilities to their full potential, it could be time to look for new solutions to make every day life easier.

For someone who is elderly or disabled, here are some bathroom features you might be interested in installing this new year.


  • Walk-in baths

Having a bath is a lovely way to wash away the day’s stresses, and for those who find it hard to stand up for long periods of time, they are far safer to use than showers.

However, lots of people may struggle to climb into a tub, which is why a walk-in bath may be the ideal solution.

These have a door for you to let yourself in, so you don’t have to lift your leg over the tub, and some have seats so you can sit down comfortably and stand up easily without having to exert yourself.


  • Bath lifts

If you don’t want to get a new bath, but instead just want some help getting in and out of your tub, you could get a bath lift.

There is a range of different types available, including ones that are inflatable or bath belts that can help lever you out once you have finished washing.


  • Shower seats

Alternatively, those who love the feel of a shower can choose a shower seat that enables them to sit down when they are tired. These fold away, so the cubicle can also be used by those who are able bodied.

walk in bath with glass door
Dec 03



The end 2016, we are pleased to announce our December sale on selected products. The price reductions will run from 5th to 31st December, so don’t miss out! If you are considering a walk in bath for yourself, or a relative, now is the time to purchase! Our prices are already very competitive, but these reduced prices offer incredible value for money.

Baths take 2-3 weeks to manufacture, so we can still deliver pre-Christmas if you order early. Otherwise delivery will be in the New Year.

Take a look now on www.practicalbathing.co.uk

stock Sapphire 1 chassis
Sep 27

I need a walk in bath NOW!!


We sometimes receive calls asking if we have a particular walk in bath “in stock”. The walk in baths we offer are specialist items. Each is hand made to order in the UK factory. As such, delivery is normally 2 to 6 weeks depending on the model and the workflow.

So why does it take so long to make a walk in bath?

Well, let’s start with the material. “Standard” baths are made from a single sheet of acrylic which is heated up to make it floppy. It then goes in front of a vacuum former and is literally sucked into shape within seconds. It can then be trimmed and assembled. The factory we visited was producing hundreds a day. By contrast, walk in baths, are made from hand layered glass reinforced plastic (GRP).  Why? Because you simply can’t “suck” a sheet of acrylic that deep (we are talking about the deep tubs here) without it becoming incredibly thin. GRP is also considerably more robust and stable – exactly what you want when the side of the bath has a door! Needless to say, we don’t sell acrylic walk in baths…

Now let’s talk about the chassis. Have you noticed how flimsy most bath feet or cradles are these days? That’s because a bit of flex on a standard bath doesn’t matter – the water won’t go anywhere! But a walk in bath has a door with a seal, so we need a rigid, stable support frame. Walk in bath frames are normally welded 1 inch steel tubing, extending up to the bath rim. Depending on the model, numerous feet will support the base to ensure no flexing occurs. Once properly installed, they are rock solid!

The bath shell will be hand fitted to the chassis, adjusted as necessary and then filled with water to test the seal.

As there are so many models and variants, it is not really feasible to make and stock baths “just in case”.

So if you need a walk in bath, please plan ahead as you just can’t rush quality!